Chekhov's Gun

By Jack Rubin

IMPRINT: Emma Stern

ISBN: 978-1-911224-04-4

PAGES: 154

PUBLICATION DATE: 18/01/2016

FORMAT: Paperback

£7.99

Jack Rubin is tough, fast with his fists, and totally amoral. He is also attractive to women.

 

Jack was a copper, and a good one, even though he was known to cut corners and not always to follow rules. He made enemies in the top brass and among politicians. So, after five years of service, Rubin is set up, accused of receiving bribes, and dismissed.

 

He opens a business as a private investigator, not always successfully. Most of the time, he chases unpaid debts, and spies on errant partners. Then he is asked by Ives, an Afro-Caribbean gangster and pimp, to carry a message to a London gangster. Rubin agrees, and gets a slashed hand for his trouble. On the way home, he picks up a young woman and they develop a relationship.

 

A corrupt local politician, Harry Gledhill, engages Rubin to act as bodyguard for his young girl friend. It turns out that Gledhill is into weird sex, and makes Jack an offer, which Jack refuses.

 

Finally, Ives asks Rubin to accompany him to London, where he intends to reach a settlement with his competitor. Jack finds himself in the middle of gang warfare, and he is forced to use his gun to fatal effect.

+
-
Also available from
£7.99
About Jack Rubin

Jack Rubin is a police officer. He is dismissed after five years, accused of accepting bribes. He sets up in business as a private investigator and soon finds that his main occupation is to collect bad debts and harass vulnerable losers. However, his luck seems to turn when he takes on Mohammed Ali Malik, a Pakistani, as his partner.

 

Rubin, an atheist from a Jewish family, is a totally amoral tough guy and womaniser, and Malik, a Muslim and family man, loyal, frightened of his own shadow, are chalk and cheese. Yet, in spite of deep differences, their partnership seems to succeed. They have agreed one rule: never to discuss religion - and always to make their own tea and coffee.

REVIEW THIS BOOK
Book Reviews
No reviews for this book
YOU MAY ALSO LIKE